Should cardiac patients get the vaccine?

Last Update: April 20, 2022

This is a question our experts keep getting from time to time. Now, we have got the complete detailed explanation and answer for everyone, who is interested!

Asked by: Zaria Gleichner IV
Score: 4.1/5 (61 votes)

In particular, people with cardiovascular risk factors, heart disease, and heart attack and stroke survivors should get vaccinated as soon as possible because they are at much greater risk from the virus than they are from the vaccine.”

Who should not get the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?

If you have had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) or an immediate allergic reaction, even if it was not severe, to any ingredient in an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine (such as polyethylene glycol), you should not get an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.

Why is COVID-19 threatening for people with heart disease?

According to the CDC, this is because the COVID-19 coronavirus can damage the respiratory system and make it harder for your heart to work. For people with heart failure and other serious heart conditions this can lead to a worsening of COVID-19 symptoms.

Is having a heart condition considered as high risk for COVID-19?

Having heart conditions such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, and possibly high blood pressure (hypertension) can make you more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19.

Can I get the COVID-19 vaccine if I have an underlying condition?

People with underlying medical conditions can receive a COVID-19 vaccine as long as they have not had an immediate or severe allergic reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine or to any of the ingredients in the vaccine. Learn more about vaccination considerations for people with underlying medical conditions. Vaccination is an important consideration for adults of any age with certain underlying medical conditions because they are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

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21 related questions found

Are people with autoimmune diseases considered high risk for COVID-19?


Researchers have reported higher rates of severe COVID-19 and death in people with autoimmune disease than in the general population. It is unclear whether this is attributable to the autoimmune disease, the immunosuppressive medications taken to treat it, or both.

Should you get the Covid vaccine if you have an autoimmune disease?

The American College of Rheumatology COVID-19 Vaccine Clinical Guidance recommends that people with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic disease (which includes lupus) get the vaccine unless they have an allergy to an ingredient in the vaccine.

Who are some groups at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

Some people may be at higher risk of severe illness. This includes older adults (65 years and older) and people of any age with serious underlying medical conditions. By using strategies that help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace, you will help protect all employees, including those at higher risk.

Who is most at risk of the COVID-19 disease?


Older adults are more likely to get severely ill from COVID-19. More than 81% of COVID-19 deaths occur in people over age 65. The number of deaths among people over age 65 is 80 times higher than the number of deaths among people aged 18-29.

Are patients with hypertension at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?

Hypertension is more frequent with advancing age and among non-Hispanic blacks and people with other underlying medical conditions such as obesity and diabetes. At this time, people whose only underlying medical condition is hypertension might be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

How does COVID-19 affect the heart?

One way COVID-19 can affect the heart is by invading the heart muscle itself, causing inflammation within it and, in severe cases, even permanent damage — via muscle scarring or muscle cell death.

Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe if you have heart problems?

Not only are the vaccines safe for people with a history of heart disease, they are essential. People with heart disease are at increased risk of severe complications from COVID-19.

What are some of the issues that COVID-19 infection can cause to the heart and blood vessels?

Coronavirus infection also affects the inner surfaces of veins and arteries, which can cause blood vessel inflammation, damage to very small vessels and blood clots, all of which can compromise blood flow to the heart or other parts of the body.

Who can receive the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?

FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine in individuals 18 years of age and older.

What are some of the common side effects of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots?

Fatigue and pain at the injection site were the most commonly reported side effects, and overall, most side effects were mild to moderate. However, as with the 2-shot primary series, serious side effects are rare, but may occur.

What medications should be avoided before the COVID-19 vaccine?

It is not recommended you take over-the-counter medicine – such as ibuprofen, aspirin, or acetaminophen – before vaccination for the purpose of trying to prevent vaccine-related side effects.

Does age increase the risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

Your chances of getting seriously sick with COVID-19 go up with your age. Someone who's in their 50s is at higher risk than someone in their 40s, and so on. The highest risk is in people 85 and older.

Are people of a particular age vulnerable to coronavirus disease?

People of all ages can be infected by the COVID-19 virus.
Older people and younger people can be infected by the COVID-19 virus. Older people, and people with pre-existing medical conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and heart disease appear to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill with the virus.

Is high blood pressure a probable risk factor for COVID-19?

Growing data shows a higher risk of COVID-19 infections and complications in people with high blood pressure.

Analysis of early data from both China and the U.S. shows that high blood pressure is the most commonly shared pre-existing condition among those hospitalized, affecting between 30% to 50% of the patients.

Which group of children at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?

Similar to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Are ethnic minority people at a higher risk of severe COVID-19?

CDC's Coronavirus Disease 2019-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) shows that since the start of the pandemic, people from racial and ethnic minority groups have been at increased risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalizations compared to non-Hispanic White people.

Are those with diabetes at higher risk of serious COVID-19 illness?

Early studies have shown that about 25% of people who went to the hospital with severe COVID-19 infections had diabetes. Those with diabetes were more likely to have serious complications and to die from the virus.

Can immunocompromised people get the COVID-19 vaccine?

People with immunocompromising conditions or people who take immunosuppressive medications or therapies are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness. The currently FDA-approved or FDA-authorized COVID-19 vaccines are not live vaccines and therefore can be safely administered to immunocompromised people.

Am I at risk for COVID-19 if I have rheumatoid arthritis?

If you have rheumatoid arthritis (RA), you're more likely to get certain infections. That means you may have a higher chance of getting COVID-19. If you do get sick, your symptoms could be more serious than someone who doesn't have RA.

Are immunocompromised individuals more vulnerable to COVID-19?

People who are immunocompromised in a manner similar to those who have undergone solid organ transplantation have a reduced ability to fight infections and other diseases, and they are especially vulnerable to infections, including COVID-19.